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Reported Transfer Budget Of £50m Plus Player Sales Confirmed In George Caulkin Interview



In George Caulkin’s interview with Rafa Benitez, it was revealed the reported £50m plus players sales was accurate.

This is what Benitez told George Caulkin when the transfer budget was raised:

“I didn’t ask for any money. I just wanted to know how much [there was].

“The club put out some information about the budget being around million plus the money from sales and that was fine. I wasn’t complaining. I knew it was the reality.”

If Rafa had stayed, he could have also gotten an additional £40m in the likely sales of Isaac Hayden and Dwight Gayle. This would make for a very decent transfer budget.

From his comments, there does appear to be a tinge of disappointment with that budget, though it is by far and away the most he would have had to spend while at Newcastle. However, it is still dwarfed by modern-day Premier League spending and is an amount that Newcastle could have easily afforded to at least double.

The transfer budget as we all know is not why Rafa Benitez is no longer at Newcastle United.

It remains to be seen if this same transfer budget will be sanctioned for the new manager. If it is and it also includes player sales, he could have a transfer kitty nearing £150m with the amount of player outgoings these recent events could ignite.

This summer could be very different from the normal in regards to transfers. Mike Ashley will have to give the new manager money to spend or will be risking an even greater chance of relegation than currently exists.

The likely outcome is that there is more money than usual to spend this summer, but precious few players willing to join the Ashley circus.


192 comments so far

  • Genjikai

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:07 PM

    Comment #161

    Wayaman.
    Its the first time ive went to a meeting but as you can tell.im willing to do out.
    But dont know the politics of the groups or how they work or past grievances if there is any.
    Even though in my opinion there should be no politics just one goal.
    Ashley out.

    7
  • Wayayman

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:08 PM

    Comment #162

    Oh, and I think this is massively relevant re Sir John Hall. He’s been advising another group who are interested in buying the club but haven’t t as far as BZG yet. That’s why he’s spouting off tonight. Trying to sway the popular opinion. Please feel free to share that far and wide as it’s a pretty shitty move.

    15
  • lesh

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:10 PM

    Comment #163

    A little song for those either BZG or fans thinking about supporting an Ashley out campaign……. Don’t wait too long

    https://binged.it/2KUit0H

    Wait too long and it may be too late!

    0
  • bill

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:12 PM

    Comment #164

    Surprise, surprise

    1
  • #BleachTheLeech

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:12 PM

    Comment #165

    Yeah, staying for the club and fans he’d grown to love and wanted the best for and a place he calls home but that meant working for a lying scumbag who had no other interest but his own.

    Rafa got ‘us’

    We got Rafa.

    AshLIE gets no one but himself.

    Fat cnut out!

    11
  • Genjikai

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:12 PM

    Comment #166

    Bill if there is another meeting ill try let you know in advance.
    Take advice from wayayman he knows more than me.

    8
  • bill

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:13 PM

    Comment #167

    I’ll probably be in the NE this month or next, so hopefully something will be going on.

    4
  • one fine day

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:15 PM

    Comment #168

    Einsteins theory has been mentioned by a few on here in the last few days.
    So the latest idea of a walk out on 59 mins is the best they can come up with ? jeesus f@cking christos !
    So we pack out the ground against arsenal again (support the team etc).
    two scenarios
    1 We are 3.0 down and a few drift out in disgust ? All that will look like is look at the geordies bailing out because they are loosing and that will effect the players.(Where as an empty ground from the off…the players arnt daft they are all on social media and will know this is not having a go at them)
    2 The game is in the balance and the few who observe are abused by those staying causing exactly what fatso wants an even more divided fan base.
    Same as the roaring success last year with delayed walk in so Ashley turned the telly off and everyone meekly drifted in. That shook the football world didn’t it? not .
    Steve wraith is in this for one reason and its self promotion.
    For the sake of one football game we can change the history of the club .
    The council needs to get on board and organised a live site with screens so we have some where to gather and use it as a rally to rid ourselves of him.
    Or we can just sit in the ground in our way to tight (its the player issue one)puma tat and enjoy the “hospitality” that is sports direct fc for the infinite future.

    10
  • #boycott Arsenal

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:16 PM

    Comment #169

    Continuing
    Benítez’s contract at Newcastle, for so long such a source of angst, expired last night; his reluctant departure has sparked a guttural howl from fans. By now he will be in the Far East, where he is set to join Dalian Yifang of the Chinese Super League, which just goes to show how quickly football can pivot. In transit, he spoke to The Times for his only interview.

    It still feels extraordinary that Benítez, who had last been seen at Real Madrid, turned up at Newcastle. Amid the permafrost of Ashley’s ownership — calamitous miscalculations, limited ambition — the Spaniard arrived talking stature and possibility, persuading a disillusioned fanbase to believe again, to think differently about their club. His recommitment to them following relegation forged an unbreakable bond.

    On the day their demotion was confirmed, St James’ was alive with optimism; Newcastle thrashed Tottenham Hotspur 5-1 and Benítez was implored to stay. “That atmosphere . . . I will always remember it,” he says. “That was a key point in my decision. Everything we shared has been fantastic. I have to praise the amazing players who grew and fought with us, the brilliant staff, everyone involved.

    “In your career, you come to understand that football is a business, so you have to be professional, but sometimes it’s about the relationship with fans. I was lucky to have that in Valencia and Tenerife, in Napoli and Liverpool, and Newcastle was the same. In our bad runs, it meant I could stay calm and do my job. They were behind us. It is difficult to say goodbye, to say goodbye to that feeling.

    12
  • #BleachTheLeech

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:16 PM

    Comment #170

    Thanks wayayman

    I’ll look into it.

    0
  • woodey

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:17 PM

    Comment #171

    This is for all who don’t get the times, its the full interview. sorry if its been already posted.
    its a little long

    The Times, July 1 2019, 5:00pm

    He is not a demonstrative person, but there is a moment — just a moment — when his eyes mist and his voice cracks. It is time to say farewell and it is not easy after three years of adoration and toil, of pushing a dysfunctional club to be better. Rafa Benítez cannot push any more, not against the immovable object that is Mike Ashley’s Newcastle United and so he has to go, but this was never what he wanted.

    Before too long, he will be analysing and explaining again, but this man of obsessional detail is also flesh. He hurts. A couple of messages from Newcastle supporters are read out to him, explaining how he made them “feel part of something good for the first time in ages”, that his being at St James’ Park meant “all hope wasn’t lost”. He winces. There is a little cough. “Very emotional,” he says.

    Benítez, 59, will forever be associated with Liverpool, but a manager who hoarded trophies at Anfield, Valencia, Inter Milan, Chelsea and Napoli, felt a ferocious, yearning love at Newcastle. He could not keep a fractured team in the Premier League following his appointment in March 2016, but he hauled them back as champions and then, with limited resources, kept them there twice. He was worshipped for it.

    Leaving is a wrench. “I’m sad,” he says, “because Newcastle has been my home. If Liverpool is where my family live, then Newcastle will always be my other home. You can sell a house, but you can never sell home. To have that connection with a city and fans, it’s strange and difficult to lose that. I feel like an honorary Geordie now.”

    Benítez’s contract at Newcastle, for so long such a source of angst, expired last night; his reluctant departure has sparked a guttural howl from fans. By now he will be in the Far East, where he is set to join Dalian Yifang of the Chinese Super League, which just goes to show how quickly football can pivot. In transit, he spoke to The Times for his only interview.

    It still feels extraordinary that Benítez, who had last been seen at Real Madrid, turned up at Newcastle. Amid the permafrost of Ashley’s ownership — calamitous miscalculations, limited ambition — the Spaniard arrived talking stature and possibility, persuading a disillusioned fanbase to believe again, to think differently about their club. His recommitment to them following relegation forged an unbreakable bond.

    On the day their demotion was confirmed, St James’ was alive with optimism; Newcastle thrashed Tottenham Hotspur 5-1 and Benítez was implored to stay. “That atmosphere . . . I will always remember it,” he says. “That was a key point in my decision. Everything we shared has been fantastic. I have to praise the amazing players who grew and fought with us, the brilliant staff, everyone involved.

    “In your career, you come to understand that football is a business, so you have to be professional, but sometimes it’s about the relationship with fans. I was lucky to have that in Valencia and Tenerife, in Napoli and Liverpool, and Newcastle was the same. In our bad runs, it meant I could stay calm and do my job. They were behind us. It is difficult to say goodbye, to say goodbye to that feeling.

    “I have just a . . . not regret, but a little bit of disappointment that I couldn’t go higher. I’m really pleased with what we did with the resources we had, with all the things around — everybody knows it’s not easy — but I’m just disappointed we couldn’t achieve more, that we couldn’t compete and reach the real potential of this fantastic club.”

    More than anything, the P word explains why Benítez came to Newcastle and why he has gone. “What I said from day one is what I still feel — I can see the potential of the team, the club, the city, the fans,” he says. “You cannot go away from home and take 9,000 fans without that potential. It means there’s something big there, something really important, as long as you manage it properly.

    “I wanted to stay, 100 per cent. I wanted to develop a project, to be competitive, to compete in the cups and to be as close as possible to the top of the league, but you have to have the tools. If you don’t, then you suffer, because you’re at the bottom of the table, every point is massive and you know that a mistake could mean relegation. That would be a disaster for the whole city.

    “That responsibility, the fact we were suffering in every game just to get a draw, is something I couldn’t manage for another three years. I couldn’t stay there just to be bottom. It wasn’t my idea when I went to Newcastle. The idea was the top ten, top eight and then maybe try for Europe later on. If the people at the top of the club had the same ideas, I would still be there.”

    Benítez is not bitter. He does not want a war with Ashley or Lee Charnley, Newcastle’s managing director. “If I start talking about every problem we had, then it will be wasting energy,” he says. “It is not a time to criticise, but a time to analyse.” Yet some clarification is needed, if only to address the saddest thing at all; how Benítez can be leaving when nobody wished it (or so they say).

    When Benítez was appointed, the club’s unofficial mantra was “what Rafa wants, Rafa gets”, but from his first January transfer window, when the manager pressed for a signing to help ensure promotion, he encountered roadblocks. Each trading period provoked spikes of tension, but not because he was asking for a fortune; when he wanted action, he met delay and obfuscation. It was exhausting.

    “People talk about power, money and control, but it wasn’t about that,” he says. “It was about doing things right. At Newcastle, we didn’t have the money the top sides had, so the first or second choice targets were really important because the third or fourth ones would be worse and worse and then you lose something. You work so hard to prepare for your signings and then you have to move quickly to get them. Sometimes we weren’t doing that.”

    Benítez reaches back into his own past. “When I was at Napoli, Juventus were winning everything, but we won two trophies,” he says. “Why? The resources we had meant we could compete and the relationship with the technical director, the chairman, the financial director was good. We won the Italian Cup and the Italian Super Cup and made a lot of money in the market. If you have this confidence, belief and trust, then normally you will be successful.”

    So trust had gone at Newcastle? “Yes,” he says. “We didn’t have that, so I had to choose.” Does he believe that Ashley and Charnley were eager for him to carry on? “Obviously, I had the feeling they were really pleased for me to stay at the beginning, but later on, when we had different views in terms of how to move forward, I couldn’t see this support,” he says. “I couldn’t see this clear desire I could feel at the beginning.”

    The club would claim otherwise. In their statement last Monday, Newcastle said they “worked hard to extend Rafa’s contract over a significant period of time”, yet the two sides conversed in different languages. When Charnley made his initial approach, Benítez was fretting about a lack of signings; he was baffled by the timing. As months elapsed, confusion and frustration became entrenched.

    The nub of it was about emotional and financial investment. During Ashley’s 12 years, the club’s infrastructure has not been enhanced to a meaningful extent. It was something Benítez thought vital. “When I came to Newcastle, they gave me the plans for the new training ground, I was talking to the architect about changing a few things,” he says, smiling now. “And after three years . . . they painted the walls.

    “If you want to attract players, it’s about the facilities, the contract, the city, the way you treat them, the way you treat the agents. If you want to keep them happy, you keep improving. If you want to have a good atmosphere, a real bond, you have to give players the right facilities for when they hang around together. We had that at a lot of clubs. It’s just the way.”

    Was Benítez asking too much? Did he demand £100 million to spend this summer, as has been reported? “I didn’t ask for any money,” he says. “I just wanted to know how much [there was]. The club put out some information about the budget being around £50 million plus the money from sales and that was fine. I wasn’t complaining. I knew it was the reality. It was about managing the budget you have — that was the key.

    “I knew from day one that you could not compete against the top six, that you cannot spend £100 million every year. But to have a chance, to compete in cup competitions, to be closer to the top, where Newcastle deserve to be, you have to do things really well. The reason I wasn’t happy was because we weren’t competing. We could have done more with the resources we had.”

    Even so, at the end of last season, with Newcastle safe again and his contract ticking down, Benítez believed there could still be a satisfactory compromise. He met Ashley and Charnley at the London headquarters of Flannels, one of the owner’s other companies. “I was expecting we would finish the meeting and everything would be done,” he says. “That was my thought. I thought I would be staying.

    “Common sense says you’ve been successful on the pitch, you’d reached the target the club wanted which was to stay in the Premier League and the same in terms of business — they’d made a profit. Any owner would surely say, ‘okay, on and off the pitch, you’ve delivered, so this will be an easy conversation’ and then you try to finalise the details. And it was not like that.”

    A one-year extension seemed an obvious solution, giving both sides wriggle-room, but when, as requested, he told Newcastle what it would take for him to sign, there was no response (it had been a similar story in the spring). Days went by, momentum drained. When an offer finally came, it was on the same £6 million salary (less than offered in earlier talks), with enhanced bonuses but less control over incoming signings. None of it felt like a club straining to keep him.

    With various groups negotiating to buy the club, Newcastle’s takeover saga did not help. “It was a big problem,” Benítez says. “In terms of my decision, I was waiting and I was asking for clarity and, like the fans, we didn’t know. Eventually, you have to decide. I could not continue in the same way, because I couldn’t see how to progress. It had to be clear to me — who was the owner, what would they do — and it wasn’t clear at any time.”

    Benítez sent Charnley an email; there would be no deal. The reply, which explained that Newcastle would now pursue other managers, arrived last Monday, moments before the release of the club’s official statement, about which he was given no warning. “I knew I was leaving,” he says. “I had been clear in what I’d said to them. But it was the fact they didn’t say, ‘okay, we understand that and we’re putting out a statement’. It was a simple thing they could have done.”

    There has been no further contact from Ashley. “No. But he didn’t do it during the three years anyway,” Benítez says. “I didn’t have a problem with Mike Ashley because he wasn’t around; maybe I met him four or five times.”

    Where Benítez excelled was in making an untethered club bind around him. He ventured into the community, donating money and time to charities, often without publicity. He made players better. “We could see how Jamaal Lascelles was coming from a young defender to a proper centre half,” he says. “You could see Paul Dummett doing the same, Isaac Hayden, Ayoze Pérez, all of them growing so much.” Tactically, he drilled them to beat superior teams.

    The crushing part of all this is that so much of the club — world-class manager, devoted supporters, willing players — was aligned. It gave fans hope. The thought of what might have been is difficult to bear, but Newcastle’s potential will forever be stunted with Ashley in situ and Benítez cannot wait. He has another plane to catch, another project to obsess over.

    There is one more thing; Benítez has accepted an honorary life membership of the Newcastle United Supporters Trust. “Your friends in those messages…” he says. “Newcastle is what they’ve had since they were kids. They must continue to support it. Their commitment, their passion has been so good for me. I tell them ‘thank you very much, you are in my heart’. Hopefully they will be successful and, you never know, maybe we will see each other again in the future.”

    19
  • #boycott Arsenal

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:17 PM

    Comment #172

    Continuing
    I have just a . . . not regret, but a little bit of disappointment that I couldn’t go higher. I’m really pleased with what we did with the resources we had, with all the things around — everybody knows it’s not easy — but I’m just disappointed we couldn’t achieve more, that we couldn’t compete and reach the real potential of this fantastic club.”

    More than anything, the P word explains why Benítez came to Newcastle and why he has gone. “What I said from day one is what I still feel — I can see the potential of the team, the club, the city, the fans,” he says. “You cannot go away from home and take 9,000 fans without that potential. It means there’s something big there, something really important, as long as you manage it properly.

    “I wanted to stay, 100 per cent. I wanted to develop a project, to be competitive, to compete in the cups and to be as close as possible to the top of the league, but you have to have the tools. If you don’t, then you suffer, because you’re at the bottom of the table, every point is massive and you know that a mistake could mean relegation. That would be a disaster for the whole city.

    1
  • #boycott Arsenal

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:19 PM

    Comment #173

    Woody,
    Cheers

    2
  • woodey

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:19 PM

    Comment #174

    ah sorry Jail, just seen you doing them same.

    0
  • #BleachTheLeech

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:19 PM

    Comment #175

    Boycott

    Stop posting it. It’s fcuking gutting. I keep reading it over and over.

    Actually fcuk it. It’s making me angry so hopefully it will others too.

    8
  • Genjikai

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:36 PM

    Comment #176

    Wayayman
    By the looks of it it was the ones from the blog that were the outspoken ones.
    Wonder if any others that read or comment went?

    1
  • Genjikai

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:39 PM

    Comment #177

    That is so depressing that interview.
    Ny mag.
    The trust has a committee that votes on what proposals the money will be spent on.
    Im assuming if they had a nice 20 30k following for life at a 10a then we could achieve whatever the group proposes to do.

    6
  • NY Mag

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:40 PM

    Comment #178

    Genji,

    Fair enough, was just wondering
    I’ll sign up

    2
  • carltoon

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:46 PM

    Comment #179

    NY Mag I joined for life a tenner.

    1
  • carltoon

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:48 PM

    Comment #180

    I think ultimately they want shares in the club. Now that would be something.

    1
  • Genjikai

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:48 PM

    Comment #181

    Btw ive got nowt to do with them and will be signing up aswell.
    Obvs was abit dubious when the link was posted last night but they are legit.
    And they are the official voice of the fans.
    They said they had 7000 signed up. Not sure if thats at a quid for the year or a 10a but a few more thousand could really get this started.

    2
  • NY Mag

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:49 PM

    Comment #182

    Carltoon,

    I was reading their website last week, I saw the £10 life membership deal.
    It would be nice if someone (prominent) from this blog was on their board.
    I recognized a fair few of the names (although, I don’t know any of them personally)

    3
  • carltoon

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:51 PM

    Comment #183

    It was 4.000 a couple of nights ago when I joined.

    1
  • droppy in Wallsend

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:52 PM

    Comment #184

    This is what’s needed though.

    It’s growing rapidly, the tide is turning against the overlord.

    4
  • Nicky the ball tosser

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:54 PM

    Comment #185

    That’s a truly great piece by Caulkin and an utterly sobering one.

    This must surely must go down as one of most flagrantly missed opportunities in the history of professional sport.

    Throw in 50 years without a trophy and you have pound for pound the worst performed club in the history of English football by a very wide margin.

    9
  • #BleachTheLeech

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:55 PM

    Comment #186

    Thing is with nust, as much as they are well intentioned, they want dialogue.

    As we know, the fat cnut doesn’t do dialogue.

    Anyway, would anyone actually believe anything he’d say? Or penfold for that matter if they were to get into a room with nust. I know I wouldn’t.

    Not so much militant action but something sustainable and visual so as to be noticed instead of getting fobbed off.

    2
  • carltoon

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:55 PM

    Comment #187

    That would be an idea. Would love to go but I’m not allowed out on my own at night. Ha ha . Probably if I new someone was going I would definitely tag along. I did tweet some ideas when asked.

    1
  • #BleachTheLeech

    Jul 1, 2019 at 11:57 PM

    Comment #188

    No luck with twatter so far, swore I’d never use it but there you go.

    I’ve got instagram if that’d work?

    1
  • carltoon

    Jul 2, 2019 at 12:00 AM

    Comment #189

    Think they need to get more young people involved. After all us old ones were getting slagged off terrible the other day.

    2
  • carltoon

    Jul 2, 2019 at 12:02 AM

    Comment #190

    If it’s good enough for Rafa it’s good enough for all fans. He’s a life time member now.

    2
  • Genjikai

    Jul 2, 2019 at 12:11 AM

    Comment #191

    One fine day.
    I can assure you that the chronicle write what they want to hear.
    People there can back me up.
    The 59th minute walk out didnt get that good of a shout.
    The fan zones with screens accompanied by bars and clubs also offering free/discount drinks got the biggest nod of motion.
    That would take the city getting involved which would show a united front.
    Right at the end someone stood up in front of all and made the point that a boycott is the only option to force ashley put.
    It will not hit him in his pocket but will show the world we mean business.
    Any idea in my opinion is a good idea. As long as we start to do something.
    Carltoon totally agree the younger generations need to step up and show there support.
    If youve got any younger toon fans pop along with them. Show your support with the younguns. Good family bonding….

    6
  • Genjikai

    Jul 2, 2019 at 12:13 AM

    Comment #192

    Tony when they were asking for celebs to spearhead the campaign i mentioned the true geordie but nee one said out. So fcuk nas on that one but i did ask for our americanbrothers.

    2
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